Remembering Leonard Nimoy On His Birthday

Leonard Nimoy, who passed away in February of 2015 after a battle with COPD, would have turned 85 years old today.

Nimoy, best known for his role as Spock, the half-human, half-Vulcan science officer on Star Trek: The Original Series, was an actor, director, photographer, poet, musician and narrator. He was a wonderfully talented individual whose many accomplishments are our treasures.

Aside from his well-known portrayal of Captain Kirk’s Number One, he has been involved in many projects of his own creation, some of which, to this day, remain underrated and under-celebrated. Throughout his life, for example, Nimoy immersed himself in a diverse array of acting roles on stage and screen; recorded and performed several musical albums, and produced photographic works of art showcased in exhibits throughout Massachusetts. He was also the director of successful motion pictures and authored two autobiographies and even penned a collection of poetry; such creative resourcefulness is the trademark of an exceptionally talented and brilliant artist.

RELATED: Live Long And Prosper: The 10 Best ‘Spock’ Episodes

Nimoy on Mission: Impossible
Nimoy on Mission: Impossible

His acting career in science fiction started with his role as Narab, a Martian invader in the 1952 sci-fi classic Zombies of the Stratosphere. He has since played minor roles in various TV series, such as Dragnet, The Outer Limits, and The Twilight Zone, but it was not until the year 1966 that Leonard Nimoy would star as a lead character in Star Trek, one that created a new breed of scientific personalities in popular science fiction and completely reshaped the genre. He is also known for his screen depiction of the ex-magician, Paris, in the spy drama television series Mission: Impossible and for his minor role as Dr. Kibner in the 1978 remake of Invasion of the Body Snatchers.

Nimoy and Kirstie Alley filming "The Wrath of Khan"
Nimoy and Kirstie Alley filming “The Wrath of Khan”

In appreciation of fantasy and science fiction genres, Mr. Nimoy wrote and recorded musical albums under a contract with Dot Records in the late 1960’s while simultaneously fulfilling acting roles in Star Trek and Mission: Impossible. His musical career, though short lived in comparison to his dedication to acting, included songs like Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Earth and Spock Thoughts. Nimoy even sang the popular The Ballad Of Bilbo Baggins, in dedication of J.R.R. Tolkein’s adventure novel The Hobbit; a music video of Leonard Nimoy’s The Ballad Of Bilbo Baggins was produced and can be found on YouTube with viewer counts as high as 1.6 million.

In 1999, Mr. Nimoy participated with John de Lancie, the actor who played the all-powerful Q in three Star Trek television series, to record their stage performance Spock vs. Q, a comedic dramatization of a philosophical and a hilariously frustrating conversation between the characters Spock and Q. It was followed with a sequel in 2000 in which Spock and Q would once again battle each other with wit, logic, and sheer godhood (on account of Q’s omnipotence). In addition to his on-stage performances, Mr. Nimoy also lent his voice for a role as King Nedakh in Disney’s Atlantis: The Lost Empire and for narrations in computer games like the turn-based strategy Civilization IV and the epic MMORPG Star Trek Online.

Nimoy at the 2011 Las Vegas Star Trek Convention
Nimoy at the 2011 Las Vegas Star Trek Convention

In 2011, Nimoy appeared at what he has said were his final convention appearances. He gave a heartfelt account of his life and career at Creation’s Las Vegas Star Trek Convention in August and Chicago in October. He also starred in the Bruno Mars music video, “The Lazy Song.”

In 2012, Nimoy gave an emotional convocation speech at Boston University and welcomed the Space Shuttle Enterprise to New York City.

In 2014, Nimoy addressed concerns regarding his health, after being seen in a wheelchair at a New York airport — saying that he had been diagnosed with COPD.

Nimoy died of complications from COPD on February 27, 2015, at the age of 83, in his Bel Air, California home. His final message, in the form of a tweet read: “A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP”

Earlier this year, William Shatner released a memoir dedicated to his friendship with Nimoy, entitled “Leonard: My Fifty-Year Friendship with a Remarkable Man”.

RELATED: [REVIEW] Shatner Says Goodbye To Nimoy In New Memoir ‘Leonard’

His final artwork will be part of of “Star Trek: 50 Artists. 50 Years.” a special 50th anniversary art exhibit dedicated to the franchise.

Nimoy’s wisdom, compassion, and values lives on in all of us.

Live long and prosper, indeed.

Tom Caldwell

view all posts

Tom is a recent graduate of UCLA with a Bachelor’s of Science degree in biochemistry. He is currently studying muscle growth mechanisms on his time off from school and aims to earn a Ph.D in molecular biology later in the future. He can speak French and Klingon, considers himself an avid Star Trek fan, and his hobbies include studying the Star Trek canon, playing video games, reading sci-fi novels, and performing cool science experiments on the side. ‘ej HISlaH tlhIngan Hol vIjatlhlaH!

2 Comments Join the Conversation →


  • Emily reddom

    Happy 85th birthday Leonard nimoy :-):-):-):-):-):-).

  • It’s still hard to believe that he’s gone, but we were lucky to have had him at all. He gave us so very much, and readers of his autobiographies understand how much it cost him to give us Spock. He’s still so greatly missed.